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that part is impressive. but the other side is the raising of a new terrorist. this is not about religion necessarily all that is central but look at the faces of the irish republican army, there is always a process of regeneration. i don't know we are losing but we're not making headway. good people right here have talked about public diplomacy for years but we're not showing some new arguments and imagination and determination believe need to make that succeed so we have made very little progress. this administration will not do better than the last one on public diplomacy. >> id your strategy area you don't mention the other programs of the capabilities that take a lot of money. you mentioned the cuts of the bush and administration what idiocy of of these non kinetic programs and funding levels of? >> thank you. you were careful to say on the skin you had not seen that but on a close reading you will see that and be happy to know there is day section what we can do with strategy and our partners can catch terrorists also. you are right i know how you spend your career at state with the
there been a founding father separated church and state with a great reference for religion protected the rights to use in all other religious minorities to worship freely the are able to take advantage of all the opportunities economic social political cultural on that band together into what people. the turning point came between eighteen eighty in nineteen twenty three an estimated two million european jewish immigrants looking for work in freedom landed on american shores new york's ty's first settled in the cramped and houses of the lower east side along with other immigrants they can be whatever he wanted to and they could be as they wanted and they could the americans as they wanted in an oven baked it and today it may have gone if anybody is of any consequence in uniting not really american. u s immigrants jumped into every facet of american life. there was discrimination in the private sector that it never had a lasting impact. i miss the way. lights on. dr request congress says she will always be grateful for the opportunities america gave her became the famous thinks that t
, regardless of their religion or sexual orientation in the united states. that's not the case in so many other countries and so this year's human rights report catalogs those kinds of abuses if someone is part of what's considered a minority group for this country or that. it is a very comprehensive document, tony. >> and roz, according to the state department who are did worst offenders of violating human rights laws? >> they don't rank countries per se, but what they do instead is point out what they consider the more egregious violations of human rights. such was the case on thursday when the report was released, about the way people were treated inside syria. if they are supporting the political opposition that wants to replace bashar al-assad they are targeted. if they live in communities where people are opposed to be government where people also happen to live they are targeted as well. the report made a point of saying the u.s. was using both chemical weapons as well as traditional weapons into not opposing the government, they said this is just beyond the pale in terms of the way the
, not moscow. >> why is that? >> long story, but they began in kiev and religion has its roots in kiev as well. certainly, vladimir putin was a state builder and someone who wants to reassert to some extent what he calls a eurasian union. >> of the eurasian union. >> belarus, central asia. at the core of that is russia-ukraine. yet within the ukraine, you have, until some days ago, yanukovych was loyal to moscow. you have the eastern part of the ukraine that speaks russian predominantly and leads towards moscow. there are all kinds of divisions here. what i would say is that yanukovych was awful. on the other hand, he was democratically elected. he was overthrown in the streets. he murdered dozens of his own people -- >> during the protests. >> absolutely. he was corrupt as corrupt could be. we are at a very familiar moment we have experienced over and over again, that excitement. it's that moment -- >> we think history is happening here. >> democratic institutions and the norms will take hold. the illusion of tahrir square. one wonders why the great authoritarians don't realize that a square
religion. >>> "american hustle" could win ten academy awards on sunday but it has heavy competition from "gravity." we will look at all the big nominees and actresses in the race and the actor called the one to beat. >> it's friday. right now it's time to show you some of the this morning's headlines from around the globe. kerry kennedy was acquitted this morning of drunk driving. a jury acquitted her. jurors needed two days to reach their verdict. >>> usa today says stethoscopes are covered in germs. researchers say stethoscope cleaning should be standard practice. >>> britain's telegraph says babies born by c section are at risk to be obese. >>> the washington post looks at why viewers are upset with a "jeopardy" contestant. his playing style goes against tradition. he asked the all-time "jeopardy" champion about the newcomer this month. >> what do you think about chew who is winning it in an unorthodoxed way. >> this is smart play. >> he solved all the big daily doubles before his rivals find him. >>> and then the dogsled race kicks off this weekend in alaska. the
of behavior do you think they could get away with, based on religion? i mean, what we're talking about here is an amendment to an existing law that has been in place since 1999. it simply is closing -- well, not really a loophole, but court interpretation. it was originally passed as when you were an individual and went into a business or marketplace, you don't lose your religious freedoms, but some courts have interpreted that. but they also put in place a test that would prove, you have to prove you have the basis for your religious objection. >> a lot of people ignored that. you couldn't just go out and -- and make up a religious belief. let me ask you this, folks on the other side this is what this bill was, the modern-day equivalent of you can deny services of blacks who want to marry whites. blacks that used to get together, that used to be against the bible, against god's teaching. that was outlawed for three centuries and was not deemed illegal to do so to discriminate against blacks and whites who want to marry until 1867. and folks opposed to it said this is the modern-day equival
story but prince princed kings begin in kiev, and religion has the root roots in v as well. and certainly, vladimir putin, as a state builder, and somebody who wants to reassert to some extent what he calls awe uration union. >> rose: a uration union. >> that would include belarus and parse of central asia, and so on-- that the core of that is russia ukraine. and yet within ukraine, you have until some days ago, yae, who was loyal to moscow. you have the western part of ukraine which speaks ukrainian and leans towards the european union. you have the eastern part of ukraine that speaks russian predominantly, and leans towards moscow, and the crimea which leaps towards russia as well. there are all kinds of divisions here. what i would say is yanukovich was awful. on the other hand, he was democratically elected. and he was overthrown in the streets. he murder dozens of his open people. >> rose: during the protests. >> absolutely. he was as corrupt as corrupt could be. we are now in the-- in that very familiar moment that we've experienced over and over and over again in rec
of their religion, that's already covered under current law. the only group not covered under current or federal state law in arizona for nondiscrimination is gays and lesbians. everybody else is already covered. >> that's a separate issue, of course. just to go back to what you were saying, if you actually read the language of the law, it was a terribly drawn law. it was full of language like if there's a compelling state interest, then you can compel someone to even violate what he calls his religious conscience. the point is i think reasonable people can agree and we should find the areas of agreement, not disagreement. for instance, i do think we should agree that people should not be forced by government to do something that seriously violates conscience if it is based on a legitimate religious recognized in your church. however, that doesn't give you the right to ban access to what was called public accommodations. that was the basis for the greatest legislation in this area, the civil rights act of 1964. i think we ought to go back to that and specify public accommodations. >> but again f
with her if she could come up with one single example of discrimination based on religion in arizona that people of faith have suffered through. she couldn't come up with one other than hypotheticals that maybe might happen. but she had no actual example of it actually having occurred. that's interesting because governor brewer specifically pointed that out. i want to play some of that exchange we had with nancy barta, one of the authors of s b 1062. >> senator, do you have any actual example of someone in arizona being forced to do something against their religious beliefs? >> well, in arizona it could be happening all the time, yes. >> do you have an actual example? >> well, surely. people may be being asked to -- >> i mean where it's actually happened. >> well, obviously if people aren't bringing it to court we don't know about it at this point. but we do know that without this law, people would not be able to defend themselves in court. >> but again, you can't name actually one example where this has happened. because people opposed to this say look, this is a problem -- this is
-worth. not community or religion. it is looking in the mirror in the morning. i am with that type of money. >> is that the american psyche? >> it is, but it gets emotional when the government says, you are worth less and not worth this much. be prepared for pushback. >> is compensation on three or four or five years, do people hate that? >> people ate that. but the total compensation of the executive compensation package being tied to long-term performance so your personal compensation is tied to the overall success or failure of the company for whom you work. is with us on a busy morning. we will go to provo, utah, g oogle glass. what about google fiber? changing the way that you are wired. with markets on the move, this is "bloomberg surveillance." ♪ >> good morning, everyone. "bloomberg surveillance," i am tom keene with scarlet fu and adam johnson. we are little bit better than we were at 6 a.m. this morning. robert kaplan is with us and we will talk about leadership with him. we talk about what you are really meant to do. today, it was to tie the bowtie. , the kenneth feinberg secon
businesses to turn away gay customers. in the name of religion. >> arizona governor jan brewer is under intense pressure to veto, tweeting overnight that she will do the right thing for the state. more now from abc's cecilia vega. >> outrage at the state capitol. as governor jan brewer faces a decision, does she sign into law a bill in the name of religious freedom to refuse to serve gay people or veto it. but companies are pouncing, saying the law would create an unfriendly climate that's bad for business. joining the chorus, marriott hotels. tech giant, apple. which has plans to open a 2,000 job high-tech plant in the state. and american airlines. whose ceo wrote, this bill send the wrong message. mitt romney chimed in urging a veto. even the nfl weighs in. with next year's super bowl set to be played in arizona, the league says it supports tolerance and inclusiveness. >> it is discrimination couched behind the belief that i can hide behind my religious beliefs. >> the opposition has been loud, but you from the backers of this bill so far we are hearing silence. we tried to find busin
religion if they didn't want to -- in particular if they didn't want to serve a customer. but the laws were not so specific as to say, well, you don't have to serve a gay person. they were just stating that you could cite religion as a reason not to do so in a court proceeding. now, whether or not they're a backlash to same-sex marriage, it's obvious the changes were proposed for that reason because that's what the legislators said that they were concerned about. i don't think it's going to do anything to stem the tide of support for same-sex marriage or for gay rights generally. >> adam, thank you. >>> up next, the "brain trust," spike lee, this is msnbc. suddee a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip and instantly open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicines alone. so you can breathe and sleep. shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe right. so you can breathe and sleep. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go. bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok
blooded murder. british government said this was nothing to do with religion or faith. of course the jury in the court agreed. it took them just an hour and a half, 90 minutes to sentence these men to convicted these men and for the four men of the jury to say they were guilty. >> sentencing has been delayed over life tariffs. can you explain what these are? >> the life terms, life is the mandatory sentence for murder, so these men will get life, but life in the u.k. does not always mean life, it comes with a caveat in a lot of cases. it could be with a minimum term of 20, 30, 40 years, therefore a killer could potentially be released in the future. this is the kind of case where you have members of the public, newspapers saying throw away the key, they should never be builds. the trial judge said when these men were convicted, he was delaying sentencing, waiting for a key court case which we all knew was coming, it happened last week here, the court of appeals judges ruled that some killers can be sentenced without question to life behind bars, their entire life, they will never, ever be
of religion are in the first amendment to the united states constitution. >> yes, they are. >> when should they take a state? this law in arizona you have to prove as a businessman you were being burdened in your religious exercise. it didn't give the right of people to just say, i discriminated based on my faith. you had 11 republicans and democrats, harvard law professors and others saying this has been mischaracterized. >> you didn't need the law because there is no special protection. i want to move off that point to the point you just made. substantial burden to my faith. how is it a substantial burden to your faith to take photos of a gay wedding if you are a catholic? >> i think if people say, listen, i don't want to sanction polygamy or gay marriage or anything other than traditional marriage, we need to respect that. if you don't like it, shop around. it's not hard for gays to find somebody who is going to take a picture of them is there? >> how is it a substantial burden to your catholic faith to do that? where in your faith does it say that doing that is very wrong? >> you know
is going to cause discrimination based upon religion in arizona. i scoffed at that until tonight. when a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to sheriff joe, wouldn't give him his dinner because he says i don't serve slime. >> reporter: he was a supporter of the immigration law in 2010. he declined to speak with cnn said the statements i maid were satirical comedy. did this roast go too far? >> it was a roast. john kavanaugh is my friend. he's not a racist. there's a double standard around here. everybody is talking about him. what about the activists and these civil rights that call mena decide and hitler. why isn't there an uproar about calling me every name in the book. why are they worried about some roast? >> yes. all right. coming up next on "new day" -- it does matter when you tell jokes. coming up next on "new day" sure it's an honor being nominated but there are no losers on oscar night. wait until you see what the stars will be going home with in those gift bags. i got to go back to hollywood. >> i'm sure they will report them on their taxes. ♪ honestly? i wanted a smart
a controversial bill that divided the state. supporters touted the legislation as protecting religion freedom for businesses but critics said sb 1060 denying legal service to same-sex couples. the governor's decision follows intense pressure, including thousands of petitions from human rights activists and press releases from some of the nation's largest corporation. among them is american airlines and daeelta and apple. >> instead, this is the first policy bill to cross my desk. senate bill 1062 does not address a specific or present concern related to religious liberty in arizona. i've not heard one example in arizona where business owners religious liberty has been violated. the bill is broadly worded and could result in negative consequences. after weighing all of the argument i have vetoed senate bill 1062 moments ago. >> john mccain and jeff plak who are republican senators publicly lobbied for the governor's veto and hailed the decision they made. >> mark, call it like she is. governor brewer was looking at business. she heard from the commissioner of the nfl they may take the super bo
the memory of her father at her drugged driving trial. will it help her avoid a conviction? >>> religion on the big screen. why hollywood is suddenly banking on the bible. but first, this is "today" on nbc. banking on the bible. but first, this is "tod >>> coming up on "trending," three parent babies, the controversial fertilization procedure. >>> we'll get the photo shop treatment on "love your selfie." eat right. not less. [ woman ] hi, this looks interesting! what's going on here? would you like to try some hot cereal? [ female announcer ] special k nourish hot cereal. special k? wow! wow! [ female announcer ] made with superfoods... superfoods sound good to me. there's quinoa, barley. i can definitely taste the quinoa. good! i can't believe that's less than 200 calories. [ female announcer ] ...to help you truly shine. this is a way to be good to me. [ female announcer ] nurturing yourself. what will you gain when you lose? [ female announcer ] nurturing yourself. in this season's most important fashion trend, the long shirt. designed to flatter, with playful hemlines and length for
the world. >> father jonathan morris saw this movie. our fox news religion contributor. father, good to see you. what'd you think of it? >> well done! i live tweeted my experience of the film. i thought it was well done. it proves when you have the formula of great talent, and mark burnett and row ma downey are great talent, and production qualities, and secondly you have money put into it, and they did do that, and thirdly, you have faith-filled producers doing a film, it works. and ten years ago to the weekend, "the passion of the christ" came out. this came out -- this movie came out on friday, beat expectations. the industry had suggested maybe $7.2 million. it's now grossed $9.4 million on a friday. it's going to have a good weekend. it beat "the lego movie." and so -- >> hollywood has learned that the bible kind of sells. >> it does, as long as it's done, as i mentioned, that form la with the faith-filled producers and super good talent. you can't just put jesus on the screen and have him make money for you. >> it must be difficult to play jesus. >> no pressure, you know, of the chara
's religion in canada. >> also people should know, the movie is coming out in spanish and korean at the same time. >> in america. >> in america. >> did you just shoot -- do you shoot a lot more? roma, you star in this movie. you're terrific as mary. did you guys shoot a lot more scenes out there? >> we did. we knew when we were shooting "the bible" series that the jesus narrative began to unfold that we had something spectacular, and jesus hasn't been on the big screen for 10 years. 50 years since this was told. we shot additional footage. we put the movie together and this friday it opens in 3,000 theaters across the country. >> wow. look at you. >> roma just told me an amazing thing. tell me about abe foxman with the jewish -- >> we have worked across denominations and reaching out to the jewish community through abe foxman at the ado to make sure we told this movie sensitively setting a political and historic context. >> right. >> presenting the story in a way that really just emphasized the love of jesus, and mr. foxman gave us a great endorsement from the ado. >> that's terrific. >> a f
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)